Computation Explained briskly, for programmers.

The lambda calculus is so simple that it doesn't seem to be computing at all, yet it's as powerful as any CPU.

The halting problem is easy to state: "will a given function terminate or not?" No computer can solve it.

The Chomsky hierarchy relates programming languages, state machines, regexes, and linguistics.

All computing systems follow these rules and many others, both in theory and in practice. Ten dense screencasts cover the major computational topics using code, but no mathematical notation. Publication is ongoing, with eight screencasts published so far.

Watch the introduction

Back catalog of classic screencasts

The 90 classic Destroy All Software screencasts explain advanced programming practices via concrete examples: testing, design, fluency with tools like Unix shells, and other topics. Customers rave about their density, concision, breadth of scope, and depth of detail.

"One of the DAS screencasts (tarpipe) just taught what took a few weeks in my Operating Systems II back in college."

"The screencasts @garybernhardt makes are the kind you can rewatch every few months and learn more from each time."

"This week's Destroy All Software screencast by @garybernhardt is one of the best lessons on just testing one thing ever."

Subscriptions, schedule, and refunds

Destroy All Software subscriptions cost $29 per month, which grants access to both the back catalog and new releases as they happen. The publishing schedule is variable, but new content usually appears every two weeks.

The format may change over time: more screencasts, diversions into text, or maybe something entirely new. This is the outlet for Gary's thoughts about software development in whatever form they take.

If the schedule or the format change in ways that you don't like, don't worry: Destroy All Software has always had an unconditional refund policy. Just cancel your subscription, then email support to have the most recent month's charge refunded, no questions asked.

About the author

I'm Gary Bernhardt. You know me from Wat and, with luck, from Boundaries or The Birth & Death of JavaScript.

These screencasts are the ones that I wish I'd had for myself: dense, 10 to 15 minute, concrete demonstrations of topics that we usually only talk about in the abstract.